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MEMORIALS TO THE MISSING

                                         

                                                                     

The incredible losses incurred by all protagonists during the four years of conflict from 1914 to 1918 can never be truely understood.    Travelling around the roads in the north of France it is not difficult to pass a war cemetry or two every few miles.  Some at the side of the road, others perched on an incline in the middle of a field.

In Pas de Calais alone there are some 591 Commonwealth War graves cemeteries.  In Nord another 466 and around the Somme department there are 451, containing hundreds even thousands of burials.  And in other areas of France there are hundreds more cemeteries.   Yet a majority of the fallen were either never found, and/or were buried in unmarked graves. 

More than half a million men with no known grave are remembered on memorials - huge monoliths to the lost.   Until you stand inside one of the cathedral-like structures and look at the huge tablets of stone etched with 72,000 names -in the case of Thiepval- you can never truely understand the obscenity and futility of it all.

Forty nine Brimington men were never found or identified and are remembered on memorials in Europe, the Middle East and the Dardanelles.  We have managed to visit them all in France and Belgium, please use the links at the top of this page to visit the memorials where the Brimington soldiers are remembered.

The details below are just an indication of the losses and the herculean task of trying to account for and bury our dead, during and after the Great War.

 
The phrase
'Known unto God'
 
was suggested by Rudyard Kipling

 

Vast numbers of the fallen were never accurately identified -but where possible their remains were buried and their headstones bear the insciption

-
 
'A Soldier of the Great War'
&
'Known unto God'

 

                                                    ESTIMATED LOSSES
                    Commonwealth War Graves Commission

                    Latest Figures for all 3 Services

Buried  in named graves 587,989
No known grave-but listed on a memorial 526,816
Buried but not identified by name 187,861
Not buried at all 338,955


BURIED 'SOMEWHERE' 

There are a great  number of soldiers who are known to be buried in a particular place but the exact burial plot was not recordered or was lost.
One of our Brimington men - L/Corp Edward Newbery is buried somewhere in Wancourt British Cemetery in France, along side over 1900 comrades.

His headstone is located at the periphery of the cemetery and bears the inscription

'Known to be buried somewhere in this cemetery'


 
 


          LOST & LOST AGAIN.....

 During the four years of fighting and with battle lines ever changing, many graves and burial grounds were completely destroyed by artillery - some more than once.

Eventually comrades would erect memorials to the men who were lost and lost again.

          

                                                                                                         

TO THE MEMORY OF THESE 70 SOLDIERS OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE KILLED IN ACTION IN 1916 AND BURIED AT THE TIME IN VERNON STREET CMETERY CARNOY AND BOTTOM WOOD CEMETERY FRICOURT WHOSE GRAVES WERE DESTROYED IN LATER BATTLES
''THEIR GLORY SHALL NOT BE BLOTTED OUT''


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